Pune’s GMRT becomes India’s third IEEE Milestone facility

Pune’s GMRT becomes India’s third IEEE Milestone facility

PUNE: The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) has been selected as an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Milestone facility on November 23. This is the third such IEEE Milestone recognition for an Indian contribution, to date. The previous two Indian IEEE milestones in India (recognized in 2012) are for the pioneering work done by Sir JC Bose to demonstrate the generation and reception of radio waves in 1895, and for the Nobel prize-winning discovery by Sir CV Raman in 1928, said the official release.
Considering the global impact of GMRT with users from over 40 countries worldwide and the fact that it was designed and built entirely in India, the IEEE India office and IEEE Pune section initiated the proposal to nominate the GMRT for this prestigious international recognition. The formal proposal was submitted, in cooperation with NCRA, to IEEE in early in 2020, after an initial review of the history and accomplishments of the GMRT by a team from IEEE India. After a fairly rigorous review process including appraisal by international experts and additional information from NCRA, the proposal was first put up to the History Committee of the IEEE which cleared it for approval in October 2020. It was then submitted to the IEEE Board of Directors for the final approval, which was granted on 23rd November 2020, said the official release from GMRT.
The GMRT is one of the largest and most sensitive low-frequency radio observatories in the world. It is operated by the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA), Pune which is a part of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai. It consists of an array of 30 antennas of 45 m diameter each, spread out over a 30 km region about 80 km from Pune, with sophisticated electronics and computing for processing the data from all the antennas. The GMRT was conceived of and proposed in the late 1980s, built and made operational during the 1990s, and opened for use by the global astronomy community in 2002.
Source From : Times Of India

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